Beacon College president rescues Ukrainian refugee family

Beacon College psychologist and Ukrainian native Dr. Oksana Hogerti said she could not do anything knowing that the lives of her son-in-law and her two daughters-in-law were in danger. Her husband, Dr. Beacon College President; George Hogerti joined them in March. You’re next, “Hogerti’s 15 – year – old daughter – in – law, Ulyana Kucherova, told of her escape from the war. “There are a lot of people,” said Sofia Kucherova. “We are continuing our education and we hope everything goes well.” Dr. Said George Hogerti. The invasion of Ukraine in 2014 marks the second time in 2022 that the family has fled for safety. The family says giving up is not an option for the people of Ukraine. “Ukrainians are fighting for survival, and this is not the first time,” he said. Oksana Hogerti said. “We have grandparents in Ukraine again, these are my parents … people who say, ‘We’re not going out, this is our country, we’ve run away once, we’ll never do this again.'” He joined the army to serve and fight for his country.

Beacon College psychologist and Ukrainian native Dr. Oksana Hogerti said she could not do anything knowing that the lives of her son-in-law and her two daughters-in-law were in danger.

When the two went to Romania to rescue their loved ones, her husband, Beacon College President Dr. George Hogerti joined her in March.

“You can hear the bombs, and you do not know if you’re the next one,” Hogerti’s 15 – year – old daughter – in – law Ulyana Kucherova said of her escape from the war.

Along with Uliana, 13 – year – old Ivan Kuchero and 20 – year – old Sofia Kucherova are thankful that they are safe, even though they are thousands of miles away from home.

“Fortunately, we have aunts and uncles who can take care of us, but there are many people who do not have such a family,” said Sofia Kucherova. “We are continuing our education and we hope everything goes well.”

The Hogertis landed in Orlando on Thursday night with their nieces and nephews to rescue three Ukrainian refugees.

“It was a blessing for us to have three of us, and then we know that there were 300 more there, and many of them did not even have a chance to get a visa,” he said. Said George Hogerti.

The invasion of Ukraine in 2014 marks the second time in 2022 that the family has had to flee for safety.

“It’s very disturbing to know that your 18 – year – old friends, boys, go and take guns to protect themselves,” Ulyana Kucherova said as she struggled with tears.

The family says giving up is not an option for the people of Ukraine.

“Ukrainians are fighting for survival, and this is not the first time,” he said. Oksana Hogerti said. “We have grandparents back in Ukraine, and they’re my parents … people who say, ‘We’m not going out, this is our country, we’ve run away once, we’ll not do this again.'”

Hogerti said their nieces and nephews had not only abandoned friends but also that their father was in Ukraine and had joined the army to serve and fight for his country.

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